Friday, May 1, 2015

THEME DAY--REVOLUTION--


No, it wasn't shredded wheat that was revolutionary, but I am speaking of the Electrical Revolution.

Just finished a great book entitled Empires of Light: Tesla, Edison, and Westinghouse--the race to electrify the world.  A real page-turner, or rather a button-pusher, since I have it on my Kindle.

This book prompted me to read a biography of Nikola Tesla by John O'Neill, which is just as good.

Nikola Tesla was responsible for getting the Niagara Falls electrical dynamos up and running.  Niagara Falls make me think of one of my favorite cereals, shredded wheat, and its factory is in Niagara Falls. It's the photo on the box pictured that I remember from my childhood.

And the lightbulb pictured is manufactured by a company called Niagara.


See more revolutionary photos on Theme day site.

12 comments:

William Kendall said...

Tesla's a fascinating figure in history... very enigmatic. Great composition in the shot!

Denton Harryman said...

I had not thought but maybe the Tesla electric automobile is named after Nikola Tesla ... wish I could afford the car,

Jim said...

Good one.

paul said...

Interesting stream of consciousness! Great for the theme.

Kate said...

Actually you have several REVOLUTIONS in this photo: packaging and merchandising, diet, and energy to name a few!

Luis Gomez said...

Great!

Alexa said...

What Paul said . . . but did you really like Shredded Wheat when you were a kid? (I thought it tasted like the bottom of the hamster cage. Still do, actually.)

Julie said...

I love how you leap from topic to topic dragging us along behind you, Bibi. I had not thought of even the revolution i light bulbs, that alone all the rest.

Bob Crowe said...

You are the only one of us I've seen so far who considered an intellectual or industrial revolution. Almost as clever as Tesla.

Gaelyn said...

You tied that together exceedingly well.

LOLfromPasa said...

Most interesting!

Jack said...

What? You decided to read a book about Edison, Tesla and Westinghouse and the development of widespread electricity and lighting? I am amazed and impressed. (I also read it, but I spent most of my career in the electric utility industry and thought I was one of just five people to read the book.)