Monday, June 9, 2008

Truncated trees Part II

In an earlier post here http://yankee-in-belgrade.blogspot.com/2008/04/truncated-trees.html , I had shown how the city annually chops off its sycamore trees along some major boulevards, since their branches often interfere with trolley lines. This photo was taken about two weeks ago, and you can see the new little branches are coming right back! They grow very fast, and this same tree is sporting new tufts in addition to these.

9 comments:

Louis la Vache said...

hmmmmmm.....
Is this a slingshot tree? Is this where slingshots come from? Inquiring minds want to know.... :-0

iBlowfish said...

Interesting photo. These tree has not given up easy. Cool post.

USelaine said...

I just can't appreciated this treatment of trees - it happens here too, and I just think it makes no sense. Either plant a different kind of tree, or let it be healthy. I have a picture of a sycamore that's next to the high school that got chopped, but it just breaks my heart. Oh, well.

Bibi said...

Fear not! I like full sycamores too, but these really do come back to life very quickly, and in that sense at least aren't permanently harmed. I agree they'd be prettier the way nature intended, and of course there are some luckier trees around, i.e. those who don't grow under tram or electrical wires!

Gary said...

I'd say move the trolley lines and then stop planting trees by the road side so you don't have to brutally hack at them when they grow up, that or just prune the offending branches back - that way at least the tree retains most of it's beauty.

Still, good to see this one fighting back!

Abraham Lincoln said...

You would "think" a city as large as your city could afford an arborist. This kind of trimming is properly called, "butchering" or dead-heading and is practiced in this country by roving bands of red necks in pickup trucks loaded with chainsaws. They call it "tree trimming."

Meead said...

Thanks Bibi.
Nice shot!

Chuck Pefley said...

A testament to the resilience of living things and the poor planning of people.

Marie Reed said...

When the photo isn't enlarged it looks like little birds are perched on the two trunks:)