Saturday, October 4, 2008

A bit of the village in the city

On September 30th (http://yankee-in-belgrade.blogspot.com/2008/09/roasted-peppers.html)posted I posted two photos of what one can do with long, sweet peppers. Another option is to make ajvar, a pepper/eggplant/garlic relish that one can enjoy on the side , mixed with a kind of cream cheese, or spread on bread. Because it can be messy to roast the peppers at home, many housewives in the city's urban areas take to a nearby field...or even just hike all their gear downstairs in the area around their apartment building. Such was the case of this grandma and her grandson helper. I love the equipment she has, and also am pleased that this little boy will have fond memories of his childhood and grandma when he grows up. (Photo quality isn't great...took this with my cell phone...)

18 comments:

Adam said...

Haha! nice photo, Pat. I didn't know some people actually took their equipment downstairs to cook homemade Ajvar, especially in concrete New Belgrade!

I bet it will taste great!

Chuck Pefley said...

I like the fact that she is completely unselfconscious about doing this cooking chore out in public. Somehow I can't imagine this happening in a public space here in Seattle. On a backyard patio, yes, but otherwise, no.

Sharon said...

What an interesting combination of flavors in ajvar. It sounds delicious.

kouji said...

i love her equipment as well. :)

Virginia said...

Seems like quite a lot of trouble. That stove looks heavy. It does sound delicious so I am sure it's worth it. Lovely , these two!

jill said...

Ajvar sounds like an interesting relish. I love the photo of grandma and grandson together.

Webradio said...

Bonjour Bibi !
Elle est bien jolie cette photo...
Et merci pour ce cours de cuisine...
Thank You for the lesson of kitchen...
Nice phot !
See You later.

soulbrush said...

i would say that your cell phone quality is pretty good, love to see grandkids helping their grandparents, always pleases me.

Abraham Lincoln said...

That reminds me of my mom and dad making apple butter when I was a little kid. They had a big iron kettle hung up by a chain and a fire built under it that they kept going all day until the apples were boiled down to mush.

Therese said...

When I think of our red peppers in the States at .50 cents a piece!!!
But we do love Ajvar...

Louis la Vache said...

The spread sounds delicious! No need to apologize for the photo - your cell phone did a great job of catching the moment - and that, more than image quality, is what is most important for this delightful post!

Therese said...

Promis je ne me plaindrai plus jamais!!! lol

PJA said...

I thought at first she was making slivovic! Can they still do that? I remember helping my grandmother make it many, many years ago.

Bibi said...

Actually, the equipment looks a bit similar, but not quite. I think she'd have a bigger crowd around her if she were making slivovica!

Petrea said...

I like the picture quality because it's so casual. Like Chuck said, she's unselfconscious. I like her smile.

Anonymous said...

Bako, ako se o'ladio - jel mož' da se proba ajvar? :)

Thanks for this warm picture of grandma and grandson - hope he'd remember this when he grows old!

Dan said...

This looks like a great urban adventure. It also looks as if she has made more that a few batches of ajvar with that gear!

Tash said...

that's a pretty elaborate set-up. did I tell you already that my grandma used to love to do laundry the old-fashined way - "u dvoristu" with wood-fired kettle to heat tons of water & a wash-board & this was still true in the '70s. Of course, she did this once or twice a year but had cupboards of linen to last until the next wash day