Thursday, July 22, 2010

Turkish coffee

I'd mentioned before that the Turks had occupied Serbia for 500 years and left many traces behind in the language, music, and overall culture. Turkish coffee, still referred to by that name, is what you'd most likely be served right off the bat when you visit someone. The coffee is boiled in a little dzezva (DJEZ-va) like the one you see here and served in small cups. I'm not very good at making Turkish coffee, so the typical and desirable foam you'd see on the top is absent in my cup! On the little plate are Turkish Delights, also still popular. Read more about Turkish coffee by clicking on that link!

17 comments:

Luis Gomez said...

Love it!

Rebecca said...

Looks like Turkish Delights all around.

Virginia said...

I love hearing about all the traditions in your country Bibi. TUrkish Delight I know of course from THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE!

Tash said...

Delightful still life with coffee!
But the real question is, how are you at "gatanje"?

Lily Hydrangea said...

A beautiful still life Bibi.
My Dad loves Turkish Delights. I always buy them for him on special occasions.

Gaelyn said...

That coffee looks stiff, but the Turkish delight looks delish.

Anonymous said...

you can call it "srpska kafa" or serbian coffee, as it is made slightly different then how the turks make it.

the turks themself call it so (just like there are other varieties of coffee-making in the former empire, arabs or armenians for example).

but in wikipedia times, where every idiot with an pc can spread nonsense, you´ll find out that serbs drink turkish coffe and that there is something called "bosnian coffee" ...

interesting: there have been teahouses long before coffehouses in serbia (the first around 1371) while today teaculture only survived in the cities.

vienna, austrias capital with a rich coffe-culture, was never occupied by the turks. coffe was brought there by a serbian salesman and spread from there to western europe.

the "kifle" are also a product of this long fight between islam and christianity, as they have the form of the half-moon which is omnipresent in muslim ornamentic.

viennese bakers claim the kifle as theirs, but most probabbly they are a product of serbian bakers.

in 1698 the holy (christian) league (russia, poland, austria and venice) negotiated in serbia the "treaty of karlowitz" with the turks.

great britain and holland where neutral peacebrokers, treating the "infidel" enemy, the ottomans, much too good for the taste of serbian bakers.

so they provoked turks with the "kifla" that later got it´s german name.

Z said...

OH Gosh! I love turkish coffee especially with little turkish delight!

Ania said...

Here (Poland) we serve something different under that name but any Turk would be shocked seeing what we call "Turkish coffee"

Minjoni girl said...

To Anonymous,
Seriously, in all my life, I have never heard of anyone calling it "Serbian coffee." That is just ridiculous. When will we stop with the whole "Serbs invented everything and saved the whole world" thread?

B SQUARED said...

I'll skip the coffee and go straight to the Delights.

Gibepregiba said...

Right now I am drinking some modern type of coffee - instant coffee with L- carnitine, but after your post and beautiful photo, I would like one cup of real coffee (Turkish coffee). :)

I am not expert on this subject, but this much I know. I tried in Tunisia Turkish coffee, and it is very different from T.c. in Serbia. It is very weak, sweet and spiced, and served in small džezva like Bosnian. I never was in Turkey, I only read about coffee there, and by description I would say that their (Turkish) coffee reminds more like one in Tunisia, also that Turks are more tea drinkers (I tried that tea also in Tunisia). Friends told me that in Greece there is also Turkish coffee, but they called it Greek coffee, and it isn't also strong like one we drink here. Bosnian coffee - kafu mi draga ispeci, fildžan... :)

I think also that is logical that many things from Turkey came "with help" of Serbs (and also few more nations) to AU Empire, as whole Balkan were bridge, border between, part of these two Empires.

So I would say that here we drink Serbian coffee, that was centuries ago Turkish. :) like Serbia was.

Liliana Holtzman said...

All I can say is this - I wish I was there!

Daryl said...

I used to go to a hair stylist who was Turkish and he always offered coffee .. such coffee .. oh the memories, Bibi, the memories this brings back ..

Alexa said...

My WV is "tingly" and that's what I'd be if I tried to drink this strong coffee. But the Turkish delights—yum! Gorgeous shot too.

Jilly said...

Now you are talking. I've always loved Turkish coffee and with the turkish delight (I love that too!) this is a feast. I could live without the scary dagger tho but of course I realise it's not to be used.

Dina said...

Beautiful vessels for making and drinking the coffee. Do you add hel (cardamon)?
The lokum looks delightful too.