Sunday, August 8, 2010

SUNDAY BRIDGES--the one not used

This may not be a bridge in the true sense, but it did help something get across an area to another space. I believe it is a 'bridge' that swiveled, allowing containers from ships to be loaded and unloaded. This building down by Belgrade's river port on the Danube has been abandoned for years, but I was able to photograph this side of it during a recent river cruise.

Check out more bridges, real ones and perhaps others, on Louis La Vache's Sunday Bridges.

18 comments:

Luis Gomez said...

Love the textures and light here. Wonderful.

Francisca said...

Amazing how a well-framed photograph in the right light can make a run-down place look marvelous. Good job, Bibi!

VioletSky said...

what Fransisca said!

Gaelyn said...

Interesting how this bridge looks to dead end in the abandoned building. Nice shadow.

Alexa said...

To paraphrase: a bridge is a bridge is a bridge.

Cezar and Léia said...

I like the geometrical lines in this bridge.It's a pity to see so huge building abandoned.
Hugs
Léia - Bonjour Luxembourg

Ann said...

May be they ran out of money building it?

It looks like a train bridge though.

Bibi said...

Hi, folks. I think this bridge was once used, most likely for unloading containers from ships, but definitely not for a train. No train tracks leading to it nor from it.

Indrani said...

Must have been in good use once. I liked Alexa's comment. :)

Luna Miranda said...

great composition! this must be a busy place once upon a time.

Kaori said...

It does look like a frame for a bridge! Great shot :D

Daryl said...

Tressle or swing bridges .. very popular at one time .. great shot

Lily Hydrangea said...

I bet this would be a neat bridge to see in use.

Vladimir Krzalic said...

The building was an old coal operated power plant that used to make an electricity for lower half of Belgrade before WWII. It has been damaged and partially destroyed on April 6th 1941 during the Axis air raid that has trarted the WWII in Serbia, and again, in 1943 during the Allied air raids.
The bridge was used to get the coal from the cargo ships that have been entering the bay (now used as a marina).
When I was a boy, we used to crawl under the fence and played inside the building. :)
Now is in owned by mr. Beko, one of local tycoons and will be probably put to the ground and turned into a building location.

There yo go... now you know. Sorry if I disappoint you but it has never been used as a swing bridge.

Pat said...

This is such an interesting piece, with different textures, colors, lines, and shadows happening. It's like a seven course meal for the eyes!

Bibi said...

Hello, Vladimir!

You are a fountain of information! Thanks so much. I figured it was used for unloading/loading. No, I'm not disappointed; I wasn't even really sure it was a true bridge; I think another commenter thought it was a swing bridge. But anyway, it sort of looks like one!

Vladimir Krzalic said...

No problem :)
I'm glad to be of some help. It is truly remarkable site. Interior looks more frightening than exterior. We've used to find left tools and coal wagon that looked like they've been left just few days ago. I think that beside the occasional visits from children who wanted to play inside, no one has ever entered there since the war had ended.
I may go there in the next few days to try to photograph some of it's interiors but as it is a private property, you have to tell on one about that, lol.

Louis la Vache said...

It is always a little sad to see abandoned industry. This image reminds «Louis» of the haunting images of the once mighty Packard plant in Detroit.